Digital Preserve

Heard Museum

Heard Museum

 
 
I've been working with the Heard Museum in a number of capacities since 1999. I've had the privilege of being an artist in residence, an exhibiting artist, a juror on many selection committees, and a consultant on contemporary art and digital media. In 2014, Digital Preserve was formed and began creating new and engaging digital content for number of  departments at the Museums including: the Cultural and Educational Outreach Programs, Marketing, Development, and the Heard Gift Shop. I'm honored to lead our team of creatives to continue this long lasting relationship of crafting meaningful content for a growing audience of museum attendees and supporters!  
-  Steven J. Yazzie
 

Heard Museum's Master Artist Workshops

The Heard Museum's Master Artist workshop is designed to support community resilience, strengthen cultural awareness, and promote intergenerational knowledge-sharing among American Indian communities in the Southwest by facilitating access for adult and youth learners to accomplished artists working in specific traditional forms, expert cultural historians, and relevant museum collections and objects, while also encouraging sustained dialogues about traditional arts among museum professionals and Native artists and communities. 



Fundraising and Community Celebration

Moondance
The Moondance is an annual event honoring the past chairs of the Heard Museum Board of Trustees for their leadership and achievements in growing and strengthening the Heard over the past 85 years. The Moondance is the Museum’s signature fundraising gala, a majestic evening filled with museum friends and supporters in the museum’s iconic Spanish-colonial style courtyard and plaza. The 2016 event honored community members Arlene and Giora Ben-Horin as well as artist Kay WalkingStick (Cherokee) and Digital Preserve was hired to create two videos for the event, highlighting these incredible community members.


Project: The Paddle and Anvil: a Piipaash Pottery Tradition.

Digital Preserve produced, "Paddle and Anvil: a Piipaash Pottery Tradition", a short documentary for the Heard Museum.  From clay dug in the Phoenix area, to a beautifully designed and finished pot, the film captures the process and creative thought which leads to a work of beauty.  Featuring Piipaash Maricopa artist, Ron Carlos, we are allowed into the world of a modern day denizen who is one of a handful of Piipaash artists left in the world. Digital Preserve is honored to have been a part of creating this new documentary film and we want to give a special thanks to the Heard Museum, The Heard Museum Guild, and the Margaret A. Cargill Foundation for their support in the making of this film.

Artist, Steven J. Yazzie talk about a mural he painted many years ago. That's pretty much it.